Insight

Women on San Diego corporate boards

KPMG and the WomenCorporateDirectors Foundation examine the gender diversity of the boards of publicly held companies headquartered in San Diego.

The KPMG Board Leadership Center and the WomenCorporateDirectors Foundation report on the gender diversity of the boards of publicly held companies headquartered in San Diego (“San Diego companies”).

As the eighth largest city in the United States,1 San Diego plays an important role in the national and global economies. Companies headquartered in San Diego are known for their innovation2 and important contributions to society.

Under SB 826, publicly held companies headquartered in California were required to include at least one woman on their boards by December 31, 2019, and one, two, or three women by December 31, 2021, depending on board size.

This report examines the gender diversity of 88 San Diego companies as of May 2020. Among the key findings:

  • Of the 664 board seats at the 88 companies studied, 23 percent are held by women.
  • The majority of female directors serving on the boards of San Diego companies are under the age of 60.
  • Forty-two percent of San Diego boards have women chairing at least one of the key board committees.
  • More than 100 board seats of San Diego public companies will need to be filled by women for all companies to be in compliance with the December 31, 2021, deadline.

Footnotes

 

1 KPMG BLC, Near- and longer-term challenges of COVID-19, August 2020, p. 8.

2 Edelman, 2020 Edelman Trust Barometer Special Report: Brands and Racial Justice in America, June 2020, p. 11.

3 Claudia Saran, “Culture: An organizational antidote for COVID-19,” KPMG News & Perspectives.

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Women on San Diego corporate boards
The state of gender diversity of boards of public companies headquartered in San Diego

Related insights

For insights on the early impact of SB 826, read the KPMG Board Leadership Center (BLC) report.

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The KPMG Board Leadership Center looks at the early impact of California’s board diversity mandate.